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DIXON STEWART, farmer, Terre Haute, was born in Wake county, North Carolina, in 1801, and came to Monroe county, Indiana, in 1827. From there he came to Vigo county in 1829, and became a resident of Lost Creek township. By energy and economy he became the owner of 900 acres of land, which he divided with his children, giving to each of his sons 100 acres, and to each daughter 75 acres. He has retained enough to keep him as long as he lives. In 1829 he married Lucinda ROBERTS, who was born in North Carolina in 1809. The result of their marriage has been four sons and four daughters: Elisha, Nancy, Mary J., Joseph, Julia, Dixon, Thomas, and Sarah J.

HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Lost Creek Twp. - p. 393
 
Stewart, Dixon (I1470)
 
2
Bio:
ELISHA STEWART, farmer, Burnett, was born in Monroe county, Indiana, in 1830, and came to Vigo county in 1832. He has been a resident of this county and of Lost Creek township ever since. In July, 1854, he married Emeline CHAVOUS. She died March 13, 1863, and December 19, 1865, he was married to Elizabeth WALDON, a native of North Carolina. Mr. STEWART is a member of the A.F. and A.M., and is a staunch republican. He has a fine farm, which he has under good cultivation.

HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Lost Creek Twp. - p. 394
 
Stewart, Elisha (I1509)
 
3
H. ROBERTS, farmer, Burnett, was born in North Carolina in 1810, and came to Monroe county with his parents when sixteen years of age, thence to Vigo county in 1828. He at once became a resident of Lost Creek township, and began working at home on his father's farm until he was a grown man. After this he began for himself, and by hard work he has become the owner of a fine farm, consisting of 325 acres, on which he has made most of the improvements. In 1851 he was married to Miss Nancy JACKSON, and they have one son, Thompson, who resides at home and is engaged in farming.

HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Lost Creek Twp. - p. 393 
Roberts, Hezekiah (I988)
 
4
In 1995, Roy Disney decided to release an animated movie about a Powhatan woman known as "Pocahontas". In answer to a complaint by the Powhatan Nation, he claims the film is "responsible, accurate, and respectful."

We of the Powhatan Nation disagree. The film distorts history beyond recognition. Our offers to assist Disney with cultural and historical accuracy were rejected. Our efforts urging him to reconsider his misguided mission were spurred.

"Pocahontas" was a nickname, meaning "the naughty one" or "spoiled child". Her real name was Matoaka. The legend is that she saved a heroic John Smith from being clubbed to death by her father in 1607 - she would have been about 10 or 11 at the time. The truth is that Smith's fellow colonists described him as an abrasive, ambitious, self-promoting mercenary soldier.

Of all of Powhatan's children, only "Pocahontas" is known, primarily because she became the hero of Euro-Americans as the "good Indian", one who saved the life of a white man. Not only is the "good Indian/bad Indian theme" inevitably given new life by Disney, but the history, as recorded by the English themselves, is badly falsified in the name of "entertainment".

The truth of the matter is that the first time John Smith told the story about this rescue was 17 years after it happened, and it was but one of three reported by the pretentious Smith that he was saved from death by a prominent woman.

Yet in an account Smith wrote after his winter stay with Powhatan's people, he never mentioned such an incident. In fact, the starving adventurer reported he had been kept comfortable and treated in a friendly fashion as an honored guest of Powhatan and Powhatan's brothers. Most scholars think the "Pocahontas incident" would have been highly unlikely, especially since it was part of a longer account used as justification to wage war on Powhatan's Nation.

Euro-Americans must ask themselves why it has been so important to elevate Smith's fibbing to status as a national myth worthy of being recycled again by Disney. Disney even improves upon it by changing Pocahontas from a little girl into a young woman.

The true Pocahontas story has a sad ending. In 1612, at the age of 17, Pocahontas was treacherously taken prisoner by the English while she was on a social visit, and was held hostage at Jamestown for over a year.

During her captivity, a 28-year-old widower named John Rolfe took a "special interest" in the attractive young prisoner. As a condition of her release, she agreed to marry Rolfe, who the world can thank for commercializing tobacco. Thus, in April 1614, Matoaka, also known as "Pocahontas", daughter of Chief Powhatan, became "Rebecca Rolfe". Shortly after, they had a son, whom they named Thomas Rolfe. The descendants of Pocahontas and John Rolfe were known as the "Red Rolfes."

Two years later on the spring of 1616, Rolfe took her to England where the Virginia Company of London used her in their propaganda campaign to support the colony. She was wined and dined and taken to theaters. It was recorded that on one occasion when she encountered John Smith (who was also in London at the time), she was so furious with him that she turned her back to him, hid her face, and went off by herself for several hours. Later, in a second encounter, she called him a liar and showed him the door.

Rolfe, his young wife, and their son set off for Virginia in March of 1617, but "Rebecca" had to be taken off the ship at Gravesend. She died there on March 21, 1617, at the age of 21. She was buried at Gravesend, but the grave was destroyed in a reconstruction of the church. It was only after her death and her fame in London society that Smith found it convenient to invent the yarn that she had rescued him.

History tells the rest. Chief Powhatan died the following spring of 1618. The people of Smith and Rolfe turned upon the people who had shared their resources with them and had shown them friendship. During Pocahontas' generation, Powhatan's people were decimated and dispersed and their lands were taken over. A clear pattern had been set which would soon spread across the American continent.

Chief Roy Crazy Horse
 
Pocahontas (I6240)
 
5
JOHN UNDERWOOD, farmer, Pimento, was born in Richmond county, North Carolina, in November 1803, and when about twenty-three years old moved to Mississippi and there resided nine years. During his long life he has engaged entirely in farming; in fact, he has been a plow-boy since 1812. April 30, 1841, he moved to Vigo county, locating in Linton township, where he has lived since. At the close of the war he returned to North Carolina on a visit, and brought his aged mother back to Indiana with him. In December, 1826, he married, in North Carolina, Miss Louisa KENNIHORN, who is a native of Virginia, and has had a family of eleven children, only one of whom is now alive, Richard, who was born in this township, October 25, 1844. The youngest daughter died March 30, 1880. He owns over 100 acres of land, and has given a good deal of real estate away to his children, and has obtained all his property by his own hard work and energy. He is a prominent member of the Honey Creek Old Baptist church, and has been connected with that congregation for many years. In politics he is strongly republican.

HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Linton Twp. - p. 439
 
Underwood, John (I1194)
 
6
Mrs.NANCY BASS was born in Sullivan county, Indiana, in November, 1807, and was married in 1832 to Nelson BASS, of Vigo county, Indiana, who was a resident of Honey Creek, and a farmer. He died May 4, 1877. He was a member of the Masonic order, and belonged to Darwin Lodge, No. 4, of Terre Haute. He was also a member of the A.M.E. church, having joined the same some time in 1829, and was a consistent christian. They had nine children, two dying in infancy, and three after attaining their growth. Two sons and two daughters are living: George Washington, Jethro, Angeline, and Caroline. Jethro lives in Sullivan county, and Angeline married a Mr. THOMAS, and is settled in Parke county, Indiana. When living in Honey Creek they were robbed of between four and five hundred dollars by four men, names unknown, who entered the house one evening about seven o�clock, and with cocked revolvers demanded their money, and as they were unarmed and helpless there was no alternative but to give up the money. They were greatly damaged by the loss of the money, as some of it belonged to other parties, and they were obliged to deprive themselves of many of the necessaries of life in order to repay it. Mrs. BASS also belonged to the ladies� court of the Masonic order, which is now dissolved. She is one of those who by their example serve to cement the community together in which they live.

HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Terre Haute - p. 366 
Smith, Nancy (I2724)
 
7
Nathaniel Basse was christened, December 29, 1589, at the Church of Saint Gabriel Church,
Fenchurch St., London, England. Nathaniel was commissioned to bring settlers to the New World.
On April 27, 1619, they arrived at Jamestowen, Virginia, founded in1607 (Isle Of Wight County,
1608-1907) with one hundred settlers in a ship commanded by Captain Evans.
They immediately settled near the mouth of a creek on the south side of the James River
still known as Lawne's Creek. Captain Nathaniel Basse and others undertook to establish
another plantation in the same neighborhood. This plantation was known as Basse's Choice
and was situated on the Pagan River. Nathaniel was back in England in early 1621/22 and
returned to Virginia in 1622. He was commissioned to seek colonists for Virginia in
New England and elsewhere.
The houses of Captain Basse's plantation were being built when a great calamity
happened to the infant colony. At midday on Good Friday, March 22, 1622 there were twelve
hundred fourty British inhabitants in the state of Virginia. Of these, three hundred forty
seven were killed by Indians in the eighty settlements on the north and south sides of the
James River, of which fifty three were residents of this county (Isle Of Wight County).
At the house of Nathaniel Basse, twins Humphrey and Samuel were slain. Nathaniel, who was in
England at the time, escaped.
A muster of the inhabitants of Virginia taken in 1625 includes Nathaniel Basse,
age 35. Nathaniel was a member of the House of Burgesses in 1624,1625, 1628 and
again in 1629. He was a Councillor in 1630.
Nathaniel Bass returned to England and is buried in Church of St. Alphage,
Cripplegate, London England, 3 July 1654.
Sourceses: Nathaniel Basse: "The Bass Family of Black Creek, North Carolina",
compiled by James Albert Bass and James Albert Bass, Jr., 1986.
More About NATHANIEL BASSE, CAPT.: Burial: July 3, 1654, Church of Saint
Alphage, Cripplegate, London, England
 
Bass, Nathaniel (I780)
 
8
REDEN ROBERTS, farmer, Terre Haute, was born in North Carolina, and came to Vigo county with his parents in about 1828. He has been a resident of the county all his life. In 1872 he married Alvira BONDS. Mr. ROBERTS has been a hard-working and energetic man. He is the owner of a fine farm, consisting of 300 acres, on which he has made all the improvements. He is considered a practical farmer. In politics Mr. ROBERTS takes sides with the republican party.

HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley
H.W. Beckwith - 1880
Lost Creek Twp. - p. 393
 
Roberts, Redden (I1728)
 
9
Sam Bass was a nineteenth-century American train robber and western icon. Handsome and charismatic, he is best known for his brief, yet extremely lucrative career as a train and bank robber.

Born to a farming family in Mitchell, Indiana, Sam Bass was orphaned at the age of 13. He lived for the next five years with an uncle, but in 1869 set out on his own. He spent the next year in Mississippi, ut in 1870 headed for Texas. In 1871, he moved to Denton, Texas. He acquired a prized racing mare and made his living from racing horses from 1874 to 1876. He often traveled to San Antonio during this period. In 1876, he led a cattle drive north from south Texas. He completed the drive in Nebraska, but squandered the money gambling. He next tried gold mining in Deadwood, South Dakota, again without success.

In 1877, Bass and his friend Joel Collins set up a freighting business. When it failed, they turned to robbing stagecoaches. On the evening of September 18, 1877, they robbed the Union Pacific gold train from San Francisco. Their take was $60,000, shared amongst the 6 gang members. To this day it is the single largest robbery of the Union Pacific, and the one single event that launched Bass to Old West fame. With the Pinkertons and other law enfocement officers on his tail, including lawman Charlie Bassett, he headed to Denton, Texas.

Bass and the others now began a string of train and stage coach robberies, including the first such robbery in Texas history in Allen, Texas, never netting over $500 at any one time. In 1878, they held up two stagecoaches and four trains within twenty-five miles of Dallas. The gang quickly found themselves as the object of a pursuit in the Denton area by Pinkerton Agents and by a special compay of Texas Rangers headed by Captain Junius Peak. Bass was able to elude the Rangers until a member of his gang, Jim Murphy, turned infomant when his father was imprisoned in Tyler, Texas. He cut a deal to save his father, and informed the lawmen about the gang's plans and movements. As Bass's band rode south, Murphy telegraphed Major John B. Jones, commander of the Frontier Battalion of Texas Rangers.

Jones set up an ambush at Round Rock, where Bass planned to rob the Williamson County Bank. On July 19, 1878, Bass and his gang scouted the area before the actual robbery. When they bought some tobacco at a store, they were notice by Williamson County Sheriff A.W. (Caige) Grimes. When Grimes approached the gang, he was shot and killed, firing one round before he died, and a heavy gunfight ensued between the outlaws, the Rangers and the local lawmen. A deputy named Moore was mortally wounded, as was Sam Bass. The gang quickly mounted their horses and tried to escape, while continuing to fire. As they galloped away, Bass was shot again in the back by Ranger George Herold. Bass was later found lying helpless in a pasture north of town by the authorities. They took him into custody, and he died from his wounds the next day, July 21, 1878 -- his 27th birthday. Coincidentally, Sheriff Grimes was also 27 years of age.

One member of the gang, named Jackson, escaped capture and later settled in New Mexico. For many years his family petitioned, without success, for a pardon so that he could return to Texas. The informant Murphy returned to Denton, where he became an outcast, frequently sleeping in the county jail for his own protection. He died within a year when he swallowed some eye drops; whether the ingestion was an accident is unclear, but the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame states it was suicide. "Rowdy Joe" Lowe, a former saloon keeper, gambler, and a man with somewhat of a reputation as a gunman, also was accused of having ridden with the gang. However, if he did, he was never charged with any crime. He was shot and killed in 1899 after an argument unrelated to his alleged involvement with the gang.

Sam Bass was buried in Round Rock, not far from where he died. A few years after his death, his sister provided a tombstone which read "A brave man reposes in death here. Why was he not true?" Damaged beyond repair by souvenir hunters, the stone was replaced by a large granite replica provided by the "Sam Bass Centennial Commission."

As with many contemporary figures of the American Old West, Bass captured the public imagination in contemporary stories and songs, being portrayed as was common at the time by some as a ruthless desperado, but by others as a sort of Robin Hood figure whose misdeeds were not visited on the poor, but only upon the monied classes. The infamous confidence man, Soapy Smith, who with his cousin, Edwin B. Smith witnessed the shooting of Bass. The event changed Edwin's mind about taking the criminal path that the two boys were planning.

Despite his short career, Sam Bass was nonetheless colorful, and saw extreme financial success in his robberies from 1877 until his death in 1878. The well publicized and unsuccessful law enforcement pursuit of Bass and his gang following their $60,000 take on the Union Pacific train robbery was the event that brought him to the attention of the public and what captured their imagination. The single event, and his evading caputre afterwards, led to Bass reaching the status of legend.
 
Bass, Samuel "Sam" (I1991)
 
10 "Iowa Births and Christenings, 1830–1950." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009, 2010. Index entries derived from digital copies of original and compiled records. Source (S141)
 
11 "Pardon Boin." He was one of the earliest settlers of the town of Spencer, Owen County, Indiana, where he purchased Lot numbers 251, 261, 119, 105, 228, 126, 5, 52, and 53 between August 1825 and June 1831, and he received a patent for 40 acres in Lafayette Township in 1836. He was called Bowen Roberts when he purchased land from the other heirs of Ishmael Roberts by deed proved in Chatham County court in the Monday, February 1830 session [Minutes 1828-33]. Before travelling back to Owen County, he obtained "free papers" in Chatham County on 1 March 1830 and recorded them in Owen County on 31 October 1831. They mentioned his wife Elizabeth and daughter Patsy and stated that he was the son of Ishmael Roberts, Sr., an "old revolutionary" who had been living in Chatham County upwards of twenty years. They also mentioned Ishmael's widow Silvia and her daughter Rebecca [DB 3:279]. Pardon was head of an Owen County household of 5 "free colored" in 1830 [IN:19].
 
Roberts, Pardon Boin "Bowen" (I1731)
 
12 <i>Alabama, Marriages, 1816-1957</i>. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013. Source (S375)
 
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66 <p>Indiana State Board of Health. Death Certificates, 1900–2011. Microfilm. Indiana Archives and Records Administration, Indianapolis, Indiana.</p> Source (S266)
 
67 <p>Indiana State Board of Health. Marriage Certificates, 1958–2005. Microfilm. Indiana Archives and Records Administration, Indianapolis, Indiana.</p> Source (S268)
 
68 <p>Interment Control Forms, 1928–1962. Interment Control Forms, A1 2110-B. Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, 1774–1985, Record Group 92. The National Archives at College Park, College Park, Maryland.</p> Source (S369)
 
69 <p>Iowa Department of Public Health. Iowa Marriage Records, 1880–1922. Textual Records. State Historical Society of Iowa, Des Moines, Iowa.</p> <p>Iowa Department of Public Health. Iowa Marriage Records, 1923–37. Microfilm. Record Group 048. State Historical Society of Iowa, Des Moines, Iowa.</p> Source (S286)
 
70 <p>Tennessee. North Carolina Revolutionary War Land Warrants, 1783–1837. Land Office Records, 1783–1927, Record Group 50. Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee.</p> Source (S302)
 
71 <ul><li><i>1855 Kansas Territory Census</i>. Microfilm reel K-1. Kansas State Historical Society.</li><li><i>1856, 1857, and 1858 Kansas Territory Censuses</i>. Microfilm reel K-1. Kansas State Historical Society.</li><li><i>1859 Kansas Territory Census</i>. Microfilm reel K-1. Kansas State Historical Society.</li><li><i>1865 Kansas State Census</i>. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-8. Kansas State Historical Society.</li><li><i>1875 Kansas State Census</i>. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-20. Kansas State Historical Society.</li><li><i>1885 Kansas State Census</i>. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-146. Kansas State Historical Society.</li><li><i>1895 Kansas State Census</i>. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-169. Kansas State Historical Society.</li><li><i>1905 Kansas State Census</i>. Microfilm reels K-1 - K-181. Kansas State Historical Society.</li><li><i>1915 Kansas State Census</i>. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-271. Kansas State Historical Society.</li><li><i>1925 Kansas State Census</i>. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-177. Kansas State Historical Society.</li></ul> Source (S321)
 
72 <ul><li><i>Swarthmore, Quaker Meeting Records</i>. Friends Historical Library, Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania.</li><li><i>North Carolina Yearly Meeting Minutes</i>. Hege Friends Historical Library, Guilford College, Greensboro, North Carolina.</li><li><i>Indiana Yearly Meeting Minutes</i>. Earlham College Friends Collection & College Archives, Richmond, Indiana.</li><li><i>Haverford, Quaker Meeting Records</i>. Haverford College, Haverford, Pennsylvania.</li></ul> Source (S381)
 
73 <ul><li>Dodd, Jordan, Liahona Research, comp. (P.O. Box 740, Orem, Utah 84059) from county marriage records on microfilm located at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, in published books cataloged by the Library of Congress, or county records in possession of the individual county clerks or courthouses.</li><li>North Carolina State Archives. <i>North Carolina County Marriage Indexes.</i> North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh, North Carolina.</li><li>North Carolina State Center for Health Statistics. <i>North Carolina Marriage Index, 1962-2004.</i> North Carolina State Center for Health Statistics, Raleigh, North Carolina.</li></ul> Source (S339)
 
74 <ul><li>Kentucky. <i>Kentucky Birth, Marriage and Death Records – Microfilm (1852-1910)</i>. Microfilm rolls #994027-994058. Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives, Frankfort, Kentucky.</li><li>Kentucky. <i>Birth and Death Records: Covington, Lexington, Louisville, and Newport – Microfilm (before 1911)</i>. Microfilm rolls #7007125-7007131, 7011804-7011813, 7012974-7013570, 7015456-7015462. Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives, Frankfort, Kentucky.</li><li>Kentucky. <i>Vital Statistics Original Death Certificates – Microfilm (1911-1955)</i>. Microfilm rolls #7016130-7041803. Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives, Frankfort, Kentucky.</li></ul> Source (S297)
 
75 <ul><li>Ohio. Division of Vital Statistics. <i>Death Certificates and Index, December 20, 1908-December 31, 1953.</i> State Archives Series 3094. Ohio Historical Society, Ohio.</li><li>Ohio Department of Health. <i>Index to Annual Deaths, 1958-2002.</i> Ohio Department of Health, State Vital Statistics Unit, Columbus, OH, USA.</li></ul> Source (S323)
 

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