Anderson Family History

The Anderson family was freed by the 29 October 1712 will of John Fulcher in Norfolk County, Virginia. He appointed Lewis Conner executor and granted his

Negroes men and women and Children there freedom...

And he left them 640 acres of land on Sewall's Point in Norfolk County. The freeing of these fifteen slaves prompted the Council on 5 March 1712/3 to recommend that the General Assembly

provide by a law against such manumission of slaves, which may in time by their increase and correspondence with other slaves may endanger the peace of this Colony.

On 20 March 1712/3 the Andersons exchanged with Lewis Conner the 640 acres left to them by Fulcher's will with 300 acres of land by a deed of confirmation which identified them by name:

Robert Richards, Maria Richards, Kate Anderson, Hester Anderson, Betty Anderson, Lewis Anderson, Sarah Anderson...and our Children to witt -Peter Anderson, George Anderson, Dinah Anderson, Nedd Anderson, Rachell Anderson, Mingo: Anderson, Tony Anderson, and Susan Anderson Infants.

In response to Conner's petition of that same day the Norfolk County court ordered him to transport "the negroes lately set free by the said Fulcher's will" out of the colony and ordered the sheriff to assist him. Probably in an effort to "prevent their correspondence with other slaves" Fulcher's executor, Lewis Conner, by a deed dated 20 October 1715, swapped their land in Norfolk County with 640 acres of land on Welshes Creek in the part of Chowan County, North Carolina, which later became Martin and Washington Counties.

Although the deed of exchange for the land was acknowledged and recorded in Chowan County, North Carolina, in September 1715, it appears that the Andersons never took possession of the land. And there is no record of the Andersons ever selling the land in North Carolina. There was also a Norfolk County deed of 15 July 1715 from James, a free Negro of Princess Ann County, whereby he sold to Lewis Conner for 50 pounds "land lying and being between Tanner's Creek and Sowell's Point in Norfolk County being an equal part and all that share of land which was given the said James by his deceased master Mr. John Fulcher".

Lewis Anderson was probably born about 1713 since he was not mentioned in John Fulcher's 1712 Norfolk County will. There is no indication of who his parents were, but he may have been the son of Elizabeth Anderson. He married Sarah Bass, the daughter of John Bass and Love Harris, before 18 January 1732 when John Bass made his 18 January 1732 Bertie County will. He was number 87 in the 8 October 1754 Muster Roll of the regiment of Colonel William Eaton, Granville County, Captain John Sallis's Company. On 3 April 1762 Lewis bought a further 96 acres on the north side of Fishing Creek in Granville County. In 1782 he was taxable in Oxford District on 296 acres, a horse, and 5 cattle. His 20 January 1783 Granville County will was proved in May 1785. We can determine Lewis and Sarah's children from the early Granville County tax lists and Lewis' 1783 will.

One of Lewis and Sarah's daughters, Tamer Anderson, born about 1742, taxable in 1754 with her parents in John Sallis' tax list. She was also taxable with them in 1755 but not in the next extant list of 1757. She was probably the "wife Tamer" listed with Edward Bass in the Oxford District Tax List of 1761. She was the daughter, Tamer Bass, named in her father's will. Tamer and Edward had a daughter named Prudence Bass. Prudence was the mother of the Jethro Bass of Vigo County, Indiana.

George Anderson, the mulatto son of John Fulcher, born say 1696, was the ancestor of the North Carolina branch of the Anderson family. On 13 January 1738 he bought 260 acres of land on the south side of Bear Swamp where he was then living in Bertie County, North Carolina, for "2 pounds silver money" from John Bass. This land became part of Northampton County when it was formed in 1741. George sold his 260 acres in Northampton County on 1 March 1745, and about 1746-48 he was taxed on two tithes in Granville County, North Carolina, in the list of Jonathan White adjacent to Lewis Anderson. He was listed with his wife and children in the 1752 list of Robert Harris:

Anderson, George his wife and sons George, Jermiah and Daughter Kate 5 black tithes.

On 3 June 1755 he bought 240 acres in Granville from Jonathan White. He sold 200 acres of this land to his son Jeremiah on 22 December 1762 and on the same day sold 100 acres adjoining this land to Edward Bass. On 3 August 1768 Nathan Bass, the illegitimate son of Love Bass, was bound to him as an apprentice. However, Nathan was already living in George's house, taxable in his household in the 1767 list of Stephen Jett. George's will was proved in Granville County in May 1771. Lovey Bass was probably his mistress since he gave his plantation to her son Nathan Bass and gave her two cows and calves. He gave only one shilling to his wife Mary and children: Jerry Anderson, Kate Harris, and Betty Smith. At his death he owed 17 pounds, 8 shillings to Young, Miller & Company of Granville County, British merchants, who listed him in their claims after the Revolutionary War. The claim mentioned George Anderson's executor, John Whicker.

Jeremiah Anderson was born before 1740 since he was taxable in 1751 in his father's Granville County household in Jonathan White's list. He purchased 200 acres for 5 pounds from his father on 22 December 1762 and sold this land on 10 April 1768. By 1764 he was in his own household, taxable with his wife Margaret and (his brother-in-law?) David Mitchell in Samuel Benton's list and was taxable on two tithes in the 1766 summary list. He may have been the Jeremiah Anderson who purchased 108 acres on Jacket Swamp in Halifax County, North Carolina, from Thomas Bull on 5 February 1763 and sold it on 22 August 1775. In 1780 he was taxable in adjoining Northampton County on an assessment of 100 pounds. He was head of a Northampton County household of a "Black" person 12-50 years old and 4 "Black" persons less than 12 or over 50 years old in Dupree's District in 1786 for the state census (called Jerry Andrews). He purchased 100 acres in Northampton County on the road in Henry Hart's line on 3 September 1790 and was head of a Northampton County household of 7 "other free" in 1790. He may have been the husband of Milla Roberts who was mentioned in the 6 June 1789 Northampton County will of her mother Margaret Roberts, proved September 1794, with Jeremiah Anderson executor. Jeremiah died before 1 January 1794 when his 100 acres was released to Mille Anderson, administratrix of his estate. Milly and George Anderson sold this land on 27 August 1798. George Anderson (45 years and older) who was head of a Richmond County, North Carolina household of 10 "free colored" in 1820.

 

The marriage record of John Anderson to Margaret Baty lists John's parents as George Anderson and Morning Taborn.

 

George Anderson and Morning Taborn had 7 children:

Elizabeth Anderson was born on 01 Jan 1795 in Virginia. She died on 14 Sep 1865 in Lackey, Floyd County, Kentucky. She married John J. Hayes II on 10 Mar 1815 in Floyd County, Kentucky. He was born in 1797 in North Carolina. He died on 16 Oct 1865 in Lackey, Floyd County, Kentucky.

Jordan Anderson was born in 1799 in North Carolina. He died in 1870 in Vigo County, Indiana. He married (1) Elizabeth Jackson about 1829 in Orange County, Indiana. She was born in 1806 in North Carolina. She died in Vigo County, Indiana. He married (2) Lucy Jackson on 23 May 1863 in Vigo County, Indiana. She was born in 1801 in North Carolina. She died on 25 Feb 1877 in Lost Creek, Vigo County, Indiana. Jordan migrated with his family from Richmond County, North Carolina to Orange County, Indiana prior to 1830, and is counted in the 1830 Orange County census. He again migrated to Vigo County, Indiana circa 1832, and is counted in the 1840 Vigo County census.

Jeremiah Joseph Anderson was born on 26 Dec 1806 in North Carolina. He died on 17 May 1889 in Vigo County, Indiana. He married (1) Rhoda Underwood, daughter of Mary Underwood, in 1827 in North Carolina. She was born on 16 Sep 1809 in North Carolina. She died on 13 Apr 1872 in Vigo County, Indiana. He married (2) Delana Harris in 1870 in Indiana. She was born about 1810 in Virginia. Jeremiah migrated with his family from Richmond County, North Carolina to Orange County, Indiana prior to 1830, and is counted in the 1830 Orange County census. He again migrated to Vigo County, Indiana circa 1832, and is counted in the 1840 Vigo County census.

JEREMIAH ANDERSON, farmer, Terre Haute, was born in Chattanooga County, North Carolina, in 1806, and came to Vigo County, Indiana, in 1832, and located in Lost Creek township. He first entered forty acres of land and paid government price. This was his first start, and by industry at one time he was the owner of 730 acres of as fine land as there was in Lost Creek township. But on account of his age he is unable to manage so much, and he has divided it with his children. In 1827 he was married to Rhoda Underwood. She died in 1871, and his second marriage was to Mrs. D. STEWART. Mr. ANDERSON has been a member of the Baptist church for thirty-eight years.

HISTORY OF VIGO AND PARKE COUNTIES, Together With Historic Notes on the Wabash Valley H.W. Beckwith - 1880 Lost Creek Twp. - pp. 393-394

David Anderson was born in 1807 in Richmond County, North Carolina. He died on 23 Oct 1868 in Nevins, Vigo County, Indiana. He married Elizabeth Shad in 1828 in Indiana. She was born in 1805 in North Carolina. She died in Vigo County, Indiana. David migrated with his family from Richmond County, North Carolina to Orange County, Indiana prior to 1832. He again migrated to Vigo County, Indiana circa 1837 and is counted in the 1840 Vigo County census.

Abel Anderson was born in 1807 in North Carolina. He married Jane Roberts, daughter of Kinchen Roberts and Nancy Chavis, on 12 Jan 1832 in Orange County, Indiana. She was born about 1812 in North Carolina. Abel migrated with his family from Richmond County, North Carolina to Orange County, Indiana prior to 1830, and is counted in the 1830 Orange County census. He again migrated to Vigo County, Indiana circa 1832, and is counted in the 1840 Vigo County census.

Lewis Anderson was born on 10 Aug 1812 in North Carolina. He died in Vigo County, Indiana. He married Mary Green. She was born in 1812 in North Carolina. Lewis migrated to Vigo County, Indiana circa 1837, and is counted in the 1840 Vigo County census.

John Anderson was born in 1815 in North Carolina. He married (1) Nancy Patterson, daughter of Joseph Patterson and Susanah 'Louisiana' Bowman, on 19 Nov 1840 in Vigo County, Indiana. She was born in 1824 in North Carolina. She died on 06 Sep 1877 in Vigo County, Indiana. He married (2) Margaret Riley, daughter of Adam Riley and Emeline Bass, on 14 Mar 1882 in Vigo County, Indiana. She was born in Oct 1836 in Indiana. John migrated with his family from Richmond County, North Carolina to Orange County, Indiana prior to 1830. He again migrated to Vigo County, Indiana circa 1832, and is counted in the 1840 Vigo County census. He then migrated to Edwards County, Illinois prior to 1850, and is counted in the 1850 Edwards County census. He migrated back to Vigo County, Indiana circa 1870, and is counted in the 1870 Vigo County census.

The Andersons were major land holders in the Lost Creek Settlement community. The areas highlighted in red are the Anderson owned properties in 1858.

Family Notes:

Able Anderson was one of the first teachers at the 1st school constructed in the Lost Creek Settlement in 1835.

Rev. William H. Anderson served as the Lost Creek Missionary Church pastor from 1872 to 1874.

Rev. George Anderson served as the Lost Creek Missionary Church pastor from 1874 to 1879.

Rev. Malachi Anderson served as the Lost Creek Missionary Church pastor after that point.

Zachariah M. Anderson of Terre Haute, Indiana, attended Indiana State Normal School in 1870. He is believed to be the first Black student to attend ISNS. He became the first teacher in the newly established school for Blacks in Terre Haute.

Warren Anderson of Terre Haute, scholar athlete, received Indiana State Teachers College’s Highest Athletic Award, the Hines Award in 1926. He was prominently featured in the 1927 ISNS yearbook. He became the first Black member of the Indiana Board of Education.

Dr. Lewis H. Anderson, DDS of Terre Haute became one of the first black dentists in Terre Haute.

Dr. Joseph E. Anderson, DDS of Terre Haute earned a Dentistry degree from Indiana University. During his medical career, Joseph was awarded and recognized for his stellar achievement and knowledge in the dentistry profession from universities, hospitals, and fellow colleagues.

SOURCES:

Paul Heinegg http://www.freeafricanamericans.com

Kianga Lucas NativeAmericanRoots.wordpress.com